How to Upload PDF Files to Your WordPress Site

Do you want to upload PDF files to your WordPress site? WordPress allows you to easily upload PDF files and make them available for download. In this article, we will show you how to easily upload PDF files to your WordPress site.

How to upload PDF files in WordPress

Upload PDF Files in WordPress Posts and Pages

This method is simpler and works without installing any plugin on your WordPress site.

First you need to edit the post or page where you want to upload the PDF file. On the post editor screen, you need to click on the ‘Add Media’ button.

Add media button

This will bring up the WordPress media uploader popup.

Next, you need to click on ‘Select Files’ button to select the PDF file you want to upload.

Select PDF File you want to upload

WordPress will now upload the PDF file to your website.

Once uploaded, you’ll see a thumbnail preview of your PDF file. On your right hand column, you can provide the title, caption, and description for your file.

You can also select how you want it to be linked. By default, it will link to the PDF file itself. You can change that to the attachment page, which will be a page showing just the pdf thumbnail preview of the first page of your PDF file.

Provide a title and caption for your PDF file

Click on the ‘Insert into post’ button to add the PDF file into your post.

The media uploader popup will now disappear, and you will see PDF file download link in your post editor. You can continue editing your post or publish it.

That’s all, you have successfully uploaded a PDF file and added it to a WordPress blog post.

You can now visit your website to see it in action.

PDF file download link in a WordPress blog post

Upload and Embed a PDF file in WordPress Post or Page

This method allows you to display the PDF file inside your WordPress post or page using a WordPress plugin.

First thing you need to do is install and activate the Google Doc Embedder plugin. For more details, see our step by step guide on how to install a WordPress plugin.

Upon activation, you need to visit Settings » GDE Settings page to configure plugin settings.

Google Docs Embedder settings

Here you can specify the language, height and width of the embedder, and few other settings. Default options will work for most websites, but you can review and change them if you need.

Next, you need to head over to the post or page where you want to embed PDF file.

On the post edit screen, you need to click on the ‘Add Media’ button to upload your PDF document. After uploading your file, you need to copy the file URL and close media uploader window without inserting the file into your post.

Copy file URL

Now, you need to click on the Google Docs Embedder icon in your WordPress post editor.

Google Doc Embed button

This will bring up a popup where you need to paste the PDF file URL you copied earlier and then click on the ‘Insert’ button.

Paste your PDF file URL

You will see a shortcode added to your WordPress post editor.

You can now continue editing your post or publish it.

Visit your website to see the PDF file embedded into your WordPress post.

PDF embed preview

Google Doc Embeder plugin can also embed other documents in your WordPress posts and pages. For detailed instructions see our guide on how to embed PDF, spreadsheet, and others in WordPress blog posts.

We hope this article helped you learn how to upload PDF files in WordPress. You may also want to see our list of 9 best PDF plugins for WordPress.

If you liked this article, then please subscribe to our YouTube Channel for WordPress video tutorials. You can also find us on Twitter and Facebook.

Don’t Worry, There’s Plenty of Great Iron Fist—It’s Just Not on Netflix

The critical pile-on of Iron Fist has officially reached comedy status. The fourth of Netflix’s Marvel shows (and the final lead-in to next year’s Defenders teamup) premieres today, and the reception to the first few episodes has not been kind. While that’s largely the fault of dull writing and plodding plotting, though, Iron Fist himself hasn’t been helping. From the moment that Netflix announced the casting of Finn Jones as the titular hero, there’s a been a steady drumbeat of complaints about a white guy playing the greatest martial artist in the world—a complaint that has only become louder as Jones has waded intro the fray, getting defensive on Twitter and suggesting that people are only complaining because Donald Trump is President.

To be fair, many comic book fans have come to the defense of Jones’ casting. Sure, they argue, it might be racially insensitive to have a white guy be Marvel’s best martial artist; and yeah, it’s another example of Marvel’s reliance on the “white savior” trope, one more troubling after last year’s Doctor Strange turned The Ancient One from an Asian to a Caucasian role. But, they insist, it’s canon, because Iron Fist was actually white.

That’s true: Danny Rand, the Iron Fist on the show, is indeed the primary Iron Fist in comic book continuity. But that doesn’t mean that Danny Rand is the only Iron Fist in Marvel’s comic book mythology. As early as his second comic book appearance (in 1972’s Marvel Premiere #16), there was the implication that Iron Fist wasn’t an individual’s identity as much as a shared mantle that had been worn by different people throughout history. It would take decades for that idea to come into focus, but when it did—courtesy of the 2006 Immortal Iron Fist series by Ed Brubaker, Matt Fraction, and David Aja—it revolutionized Iron Fist as a concept, and as a superhero identity.

Rand, Immortal Iron Fist revealed, was the sixty-seventh Iron Fist to that point. Although the series only introduced readers to seven of his 66 predecessors, all but one of them was of Asian descent. Beyond Quan Yazou, the original Iron Fist, there were Li Park, Bein Ming-Tian, Wu Ao-Shi, Bei Bang-Wen and Kwai Jun-Fan—and none of them were a hipster version of Bruce Wayne.(Though it’s telling that the series spent more time with the seventh predecessor, a white dude named Orson Randall, than any of the others.)

Nor was Iron Fist’s Asian legacy only in the past; in both Immortal Iron Fist and subsequent series Iron Fist: The Living Weapon, the writers established that the future of the Iron Fist was distinctly un-Caucasian. The former series flashed-forward to the year 3099 to introduce Wah Sing-Rand, while The Living Weapon showed a young female monk called Pei possessing the Iron Fist.

In many ways, this is in keeping with Marvel’s general direction with regards to comic book representation over the last few years. Once upon a time, the company’s catalog of heroes who were women or people of color was limited to sidekicks, supporting characters, and the occasional team-member. More recently, though, more familiar superhero identities have been turned into franchises with an aim of more accurately reflecting the world outside your window. The half-Black, half-Latino Miles Morales became a second Spider-Man; Sam Wilson—formerly the high-flying Falcon—signed on as a new Captain America; Thor was replaced as god of thunder by his ex-girlfriend Jane Foster.

While that trend seems to be continuing to this day—Invincible Iron Man was recently relaunched with a teenage girl taking the place of Tony Stark—there remains a horde of traditionalists for whom there can only be one version of any given character. More often than not, that means the original version, when almost everyone was a white dude. It’s worth noting that Marvel is seeing historically low sales of its monthly titles, leading to rumors of a relaunch later this year that will restore the white male versions of its big names in hopes of appealing to long-term fans.

Is that conservative impulse among fandom the reason that Marvel didn’t try to switch things up when selecting a TV version of Iron Fist? It’s unclear. The company’s movies and TV adaptations tend to hew towards the “classic” takes on characters, but not always: Samuel L. Jackson’s Nick Fury and Agents of SHIELD‘s Ghost Rider were based on later incarnations rather than the original (white) ones. But if you’re convinced that Netflix’s Iron Fist should be white because of “canon,” forget it: A full 80% of the comic book Iron Fists to date haven’t white. There’s more than enough material available to support an alternative take. Perhaps those concerned with fidelity to the source material should ask themselves why Marvel didn’t really go with canon in the first place.

Go Back to Top. Skip To: Start of Article.

Don’t Worry, There’s many Great Iron Fist—It’s simply not on Netflix

The critical pile-on of Iron Fist has officially reached comedy status. The fourth of Netflix’s Marvel shows (and also the final lead-in to next year’s Defenders teamup) premieres today, together with reception on very first couple of episodes is not sort. While that’s largely the fault of dull writing and plodding plotting, though, Iron Fist himself hasn’t been helping. As soon as that Netflix announced the casting of Finn Jones once the titular hero, there’s a been a steady drumbeat of complaints about a white man playing the greatest martial musician in world—a issue who has just become louder as Jones has waded intro the fray, getting defensive on Twitter and suggesting that folks are just complaining because Donald Trump is President.

To be fair, numerous comic book fans attended toward defense of Jones’ casting. Yes, they argue, it could be racially insensitive to enjoy a white man be Marvel’s best martial artist; and yeah, it is another exemplory instance of Marvel’s reliance in the “white savior” trope, one more troubling after last year’s Doctor Strange turned The Ancient One from an Asian up to a Caucasian role. But, they insist, it’s canon, because Iron Fist had been actually white.

That’s real: Danny Rand, the Iron Fist on show, is certainly the primary Iron Fist in comic book continuity. But that doesn’t mean that Danny Rand may be the only Iron Fist in Marvel’s comic guide mythology. As early as their 2nd comic book appearance (in 1972’s Marvel Premiere #16), there is the implication that Iron Fist had beenn’t an individual’s identity as much as a shared mantle that had been worn by different people throughout history. It could just take years for that idea in the future into focus, however when it did—courtesy associated with the 2006 Immortal Iron Fist show by Ed Brubaker, Matt Fraction, and David Aja—it revolutionized Iron Fist as a concept, so that as a superhero identity.

Rand, Immortal Iron Fist unveiled, had been the sixty-seventh Iron Fist to that point. Although the show only introduced visitors to seven of their 66 predecessors, all except one of them had been of Asian descent. Beyond Quan Yazou, the original Iron Fist, there have been Li Park, Bein Ming-Tian, Wu Ao-Shi, Bei Bang-Wen and Kwai Jun-Fan—and do not require had been a hipster form of Bruce Wayne.(Though it is telling that the series invested more hours because of the seventh predecessor, a white guy called Orson Randall, than some of the other people.)

Nor had been Iron Fist’s Asian legacy only previously; both in Immortal Iron Fist and subsequent show Iron Fist: The residing Weapon, the article writers founded that the future associated with Iron Fist had been distinctly un-Caucasian. The previous show flashed-forward towards 12 months 3099 to introduce Wah Sing-Rand, while The Living gun showed a feminine monk called Pei possessing the Iron Fist.

In lots of ways, this might be commensurate with Marvel’s basic direction about comic guide representation throughout the last couple of years. Once upon a time, the company’s catalog of heroes who had been ladies or individuals of color was restricted to sidekicks, supporting characters, additionally the periodic team-member. Recently, however, more familiar superhero identities have already been converted into franchises having an aim of more accurately reflecting the planet outside your window. The half-Black, half-Latino Miles Morales became a second Spider-Man; Sam Wilson—formerly the high-flying Falcon—signed on as new Captain America; Thor had been replaced as god of thunder by his ex-girlfriend Jane Foster.

While that trend seems to be continuing to the day—Invincible Iron Man had been recently relaunched having teenage girl taking the place of Tony Stark—there remains a horde of traditionalists for who there can just only be one form of any given character. Most of the time, meaning the original variation, when just about everyone was a white guy. It’s worth noting that Marvel is seeing historically low sales of its month-to-month games, resulting in rumors of the relaunch later this season that may restore the white male variations of its big names assured of attractive to long-lasting fans.

Is the fact that conservative impulse among fandom the main reason that Marvel didn’t try to switch things up when selecting a TV form of Iron Fist? It’s not clear. The business’s movies and TV adaptations often hew towards the “classic” assumes figures, however constantly: Samuel L. Jackson’s Nick Fury and Agents of SHIELD‘s Ghost Rider had been predicated on later incarnations rather than the initial (white) ones. However, if you’re convinced that Netflix’s Iron Fist must be white due to “canon,” forget it: A full 80% associated with the comic guide Iron Fists currently haven’t white. There’s more than enough material offered to help an alternative take. Perhaps those worried about fidelity to your source product should ask by themselves why Marvel didn’t really choose canon originally.

Go Back to Top. Skip To: Begin of Article.

How to Add Taxonomy Images “Category Icons” in WordPress

Do you want to add taxonomy images in WordPress? Taxonomies are a way to group things in WordPress. Categories and tags are two default taxonomies that comes built-in with every WordPress blog. In this article, we will show you how to add taxonomy images in WordPress. In other words, you will be able to add image icons for your categories, tags, and other custom taxonomies.

How to Add Taxonomy Images in WordPress

Why Add Taxonomy Images in WordPress?

Custom post types and taxonomies allow WordPress to become a full-fledged CMS. By default, WordPress comes with category and tags as two default taxonomies that you can use to sort your posts.

You can also create your own custom taxonomies and associate them with any post types on your WordPress site. This allows your users to see all other content filed under those taxonomies.

With taxonomy images, you can add featured images or icons to the terms in each taxonomy.

For example, each category on your site can have its own icon, which can be displayed on category archive pages, category lists, and so on.

Having said that, let’s take a look at how to easily add taxonomy images in WordPress.

Adding Taxonomy Images in WordPress

First thing you need to do is install and activate the Taxonomy Images plugin. For more details, see our step by step guide on how to install a WordPress plugin.

Upon activation, you need to visit Settings » Taxonomy Images page to configure plugin settings.

Taxonomy images settings

You will see a list of taxonomies available on your WordPress site. Select the taxonomies where you want to enable the taxonomy images feature and then click on the save changes button.

In the screenshot above, we enabled taxonomy images for categories.

To add images to each category, you will need to head over to Posts » Categories page.

If you enabled taxonomy images feature for some other taxonomy, then you will need to visit that particular taxonomy page in your WordPress admin area.

On the categories page, you will notice a new column labeled ‘Image’ in your category list. Since you haven’t added any images to categories yet, it will show a default blank image with an add button for each category.

Adding thumbnail images to your categories

Go ahead and click on the add button below the blank image. This will bring up the default WordPress media uploader popup.

You can select an image from your WordPress media library or upload a new image. After that, go ahead and repeat the process to add images for all terms in your taxonomy.

You can remove an image at any time you want by simply clicking on the remove button below the image.

Displaying Taxonomy Images on Your WordPress Site

To display taxonomy images on your WordPress site, you will need to edit your WordPress theme or child theme. If this is your first time editing WordPress files, then you may want to see our guide on how to copy paste code in WordPress.

First you will need to connect to your WordPress site using an FTP client.

Once connected, you will need to find the template responsible for displaying your taxonomy archives. This could be archives.php, category.php, tag.php, or taxonomy.php files.

You need to download the file to your computer and open it in a text editor like Notepad or TextEdit.

Now paste the following code where you want to display your taxonomy image. Usually, you would want to add it before the taxonomy title or the_archive_title() tag.

print apply_filters( 'taxonomy-images-queried-term-image', '' );

After adding the code, you need to save this file and upload it back to your website using FTP.

You can now visit the taxonomy archive page to see it display your taxonomy image. Here is how it looked on our demo archive page.

Taxonomy image on taxonomy archive page

You can use custom CSS to style this image.

Advanced users can look for more code examples on the plugin’s homepage.

We hope this article helped you learn how to easily add taxonomy images in WordPress. You may also want to see our list of 10 most wanted category hacks and plugins for WordPress.

If you liked this article, then please subscribe to our YouTube Channel for WordPress video tutorials. You can also find us on Twitter and Facebook.

How to Update URLs When Moving Your WordPress Site

Do you want to update URLs after moving your WordPress site? It can be quite painful to manually edit each post or page just to replace old URLs. In this article, we will show you how to easily update URLs when moving your WordPress site.

How to update URLs when moving a WordPress site

Video Tutorial

If you don’t like the video or need more instructions, then continue reading.

When and Why Do You Need to Update URLs?

Let’s suppose you moved a WordPress site to a new domain name. You can then change the WordPress address and site URL by visiting WordPress settings page.

Changing WordPress and site URLs

However, this does not change the URLs that you have previously added in your posts and pages. It also does not change the URLs of images you have added to your WordPress site.

Changing all these URLs manually can be very time consuming, and there will always be a chance that you will miss some URLs.

That’s where you’ll need this tutorial. Let’s see how to quickly and easily update URLs when moving your WordPress site.

Update URLs After Moving a WordPress Site

First make sure that you have a complete backup of your WordPress site. This will allow you to easily revert back in case something goes wrong during the update process.

Next, you need to install and activate the Velvet Blues Update URLs plugin. For more details, see our step by step guide on how to install a WordPress plugin.

Upon activation, you need to visit Tools » Update URLs page to configure plugin settings.

Velvet Blues Update URLs plugin settings

Here you need to provide the old and new URLs of your website. After that you need to choose where you want the URLs to be updated.

You can update urls in posts and pages, excerpts, image attachments, custom fields, etc.

Go ahead and select each item that you want to update and then click on the ‘Update URLs Now’ button.

The plugin will find and replace all instances of old URL with your new URL.

You can now visit your website to see that all URLs are updated.

We hope this article helped you learn how to update URLs when moving your WordPress site. You may also want to see our step by step WordPress SEO guide for beginners.

If you liked this article, then please subscribe to our YouTube Channel for WordPress video tutorials. You can also find us on Twitter and Facebook.