Tech Deals: Amazon Kindle, Dell Notebooks, Rocket League

February is the cruelest month, as the poem goes. Oh, no, wait. That’s April. February is a great month to be born in if you want to become famous, but the rest of us might find the cold, gray days to be a bit of a bummer. In sum, this is a great time of year to curl up with a hot cocoa in front of a new smart TV. We’ve rounded up the best weekend deals with the help of our friends at TechBargains.

Grab One of the Best 15-Inch Laptops Around

Dell’s 10 percent off deals are still going strong. The Dell XPS 15 is the slightly larger sibling of one of our favorite laptops of 2017, the Dell XPS 13. Simply put, it’s one of the best 15-inch laptops money can buy–only with this deal, you’ll be spending a lot less of it.

Buy the Dell XPS 15 Intel Core i7-7700HQ Quad-Core 15.6″ Laptop w/ 256GB SSD, GTX 1050 for $1125 (use code: TENOFF).

Or you could spend a little (okay, a lot) less cash on a simple, stylish convertible with a great display.

Buy the Dell Inspiron 13 7000 Intel Core i5-8250U Quad-Core 13″ 2-in-1 Laptop w/ 256GB SSD for $700.

Give Me Coffee and TV

We are blown away by this deal. This is an amazing price for a Sony television that already manage to pack in a lot of high-end features in an affordable package. It displays with HDR and SDR content spectacularly and has tons of connection options. It even has cord management built right into the stand.

Buy the 65″ Sony XBR65X850E 4K HDR 120Hz-Native LED Smart HDTV w/ Android TV for $1000.

If you were looking for a beautiful new LED TV, Samsung’s offerings are a good place to start looking. Unfortunately, they’re usually pretty pricey. With a $150 Dell gift card, though, you have a chance to buy one of the MU7000 series for under a grand.

Buy the 55″ Samsung UN55MU7000 UHD Smart LED HDTV + $150 Dell Gift Card for $749.99.

This Vizio delivers decent 4K performance and an even more decent price.

Buy the 55″ Vizio D55-E0 4K Smart HDTV + $150 Dell Gift Card for $499.99.

All Day I Dream About Soccer (With Cars)

This is the very first sale on one of our favorite games to play on the Nintendo Switch.

Buy Rocket League: Collector’s Edition (Switch) for $30.

After you buy it, grab one a new smartphone to tell all your friends about it.

Buy the Google Pixel XL 128GB Unlocked Smartphone (Refurb) for $410 .

Buy the Honor 7X 32GB Dual Camera GSM Unlocked Smartphone (Pre-Order) for $200

Alternatively, you could spend your afternoon building your own console altogether. Switch, schmitch.

Buy the Raspberry Pi 3 Complete Starter Kit w/ Retro Gaming Case for $65.99 (use code: 45YOCHIQ).

Alexa Is Coming For You

Are you terrified of the upcoming takeover of the smart home assistants? Stave off the inevitable with the Amazon Fire 10 and practice shouting at devices with the hands-free Alexa feature.

Buy the All-New Amazon Fire HD 10 for $120.

The Kindle Paperwhite is, by far, the best Kindle for your money. And now you get to spend less of it!

Buy the Amazon Kindle Paperwhite 6″ WiFi eReader for $100.

Do you need a quiet, simple, good-looking robovac for easy household maintenance? The Eufy Robovac 11+ is a good option.

Buy the Eufy RoboVac 11+ Self-Charging Robotic Vacuum w/ HEPA Style Filter for $220 (Clip $30 Coupon).

Finding out your genetic background is the gift that keeps on giving. You can’t put a price on learning that you’re part Norwegian.

Buy the AncestryDNA: Genetic Testing DNA Ancestry Test Kit for $69.

It’s not as showy as a bouquet of flowers, but showing that you don’t want your loved one stranded on the side of the highway is very romantic indeed.

Buy the Aukey 400A 12000mAh Portable Jump Starter & Power Bank for $35 (use code: AUKEYBC1).

When you buy something using the retail links in our stories, we earn a small affiliate commission. Read more about how this works.

WIRED’s Top Stories in January: The Diversity War Inside Google

One of WIRED’s biggest stories this month actually traces its genesis to a moment all the way back in August. That’s when a Google engineer named James Damore published a 10-page memo criticizing what he called the company’s “left bias” and its creation of “a politically correct monoculture.” The missive sent a shockwave through Google, which ultimately fired Damore, and prompted much internal discussion over the company’s diversity efforts.

Unsurprisingly, this internal reckoning has created some deep divisions within Google, and on January 26, senior writer Nitasha Tiku spoke to 15 current Google employees who say some of their coworkers are inciting outsiders to harass Damore’s critics in public forums. These Googlers, many of them de facto diversity advocates, say they have had their personal details published online and received death threats. What’s more, the employees say, their colleagues have “weaponized human resources,” goading others into saying inflammatory things that are then reported to HR in an attempt to have people punished or fired.

It all points to a larger, more foundational problem Google now finds itself grappling with. As Tiku writes in her piece, “The complaints underscore how Google’s freewheeling workplace culture, where employees are encouraged to ‘bring your whole self to work’ and exchange views on internal discussion boards, has turned as polarized and toxic as the national political debate.” Tiku’s story offers a rare glimpse into Google, which has long been tight-lipped and insular, as it navigates an increasingly divided landscape.

Of course, WIRED covered much more than that this month. Below are January’s 10 most-read stories.

Critical ‘Meltdown’ and ‘Spectre’ Flaws Break Basic Security for Intel, AMD, ARM Computers

A Google-led team of researchers has found a critical chip flaw in millions of computers that developers are now scrambling to patch. —Andy Greenberg

How Meltdown and Spectre Were Independently Discovered By Four Research Teams at Once

The uncanny coincidences among the Meltdown and Spectre discoveries raise questions about “bug collisions”—and the safety of the NSA’s hidden vulnerability collection. —Andy Greenberg

Riding a Wild Wind, a Norwegian 787 Breaks a Speed Record

A 200-mph jet stream sent several passenger jets to nearly 800 mph, and helped break a (subsonic) speed record. —Jack Stewart

The Logan Paul ‘Suicide Forest’ Video Should Be a Reckoning for YouTube

Logan Paul’s video of Japan’s “suicide forest” was a nadir for the YouTube star. And the platform that enables him. —Louise Matsakis

3.5 Billion-Year-Old Fossils Challenge Ideas About Earth’s Start

A series of fossil finds suggests that life on Earth started earlier than anyone thought, calling into question a widely held theory of the solar system’s beginnings. —Rebecca Boyle

Get a Password Manager. Here’s Where to Start

How important are password managers? Even their flaws double as reminders for why you need one. —Lily Hay Newman

The Dirty War Over Diversity Inside Google

Advocates for greater diversity at Google say they are being harassed and targeted on right-wing websites. —Nitasha Tiku

Scientists Discover Clean Water Ice Just Below Mars’ Surface

It’s not just the volume of water they found; it’s how mineable it promises to be. —Robbie Gonzalez

The Strange History of One of the Internet’s First Viral Videos

*The video known as badday.mpg has been an internet phenomenon for more than 20 years. —Joe Veix

Why the Bomb Cyclone Hitting the East Coast Is So Unusual

*Winter Storm Grayson isn’t your typical bombogenerator, and more huge storms could follow. —Megan Molteni

Can an Airplane remove for a going Runway?

This real question is probably as old because the airplane itself. It goes something such as this:

An airplane includes a takeoff speed of 100 mph (I just made that number up). What if it gets for a super giant treadmill machine that moves backwards at 100 mph. Could a plane with this giant treadmill machine remove or would it not simply sit there going at 0 miles per hour?

Initial question a reasonable individual would ask is “in which would you get yourself a giant plane-sized treadmill machine that goes 100 miles per hour?” Yes, which indeed a great question—but i will not answer it. Instead, i will offer this question top physics answer I am able to.

Before i actually do that, i ought to explain that others also have answered this question (not surprising as it’s super old anyway). First, there was the MythBusters episode from 2008. In fact, they didn’t answer the question—they did issue. The MythBusters made a giant conveyer belt having plane about it. It had been awesome. Next, there is the xkcd response to this concern (additionally from 2008).

Now you get my answer. I shall respond to with different examples.

A Car on a Conveyer Belt

This isn’t so difficult. Let’s say I put an automobile going 100 mph on a conveyer gear that is also going 100 mph? It could appear to be this (something like this):

Actually, there’s probably no real surprise right here. The vehicle’s tires would roll at 100 miles per hour as the treadmill machine (or conveyer gear) moves back at 100 mph so that the vehicle stays stationary. Really, here is a somewhat cooler example (with the same physics).

Let me reveal an test (also from MythBusters) which they shot a ball at 60 mph out of the back of a truck additionally going 60 miles per hour. You can view your ball stays fixed (with regards to the ground).

Super Brief Takeoff

Here is a airplane from Alaska that takes off in a really short distance.

How exactly does this work? We’ll provide you with a hint—there is definitely a strong wind blowing in to the front side for the plane. Without a headwind, this couldn’t happen. However if you consider it, this brief lose is certainly much such as the vehicle regarding treadmill machine. For the plane, it generally does not drive on the floor, it “drives” in the air. In the event that airplane possesses takeoff rate of 40 miles per hour and is in a 40 mph headwind, it doesn’t even have to go at all according to the ground.

Airplane for a Conveyer Belt

Now let us do it. This is a short clip from MythBusters launching a plane on a going treadmill machine.

Yes, it requires off. A plane takes faraway from a runway relocating the opposite direction? But why? It is because the tires for a plane never really do anything. The only function for the wheels would be to produce low friction between your aircraft together with ground. They do not also push the airplane forward—that is performed by the propeller. Truly the only distinction whenever releasing an airplane for a moving runway is the fact that wheels will spin at twice the standard speed—but that willn’t matter.

Therefore the airplane on a treadmill works, but how about a case where in fact the plane wouldn’t take off? Imagine if the plane ended up being similar to a glider with motorized tires? For a normal runway, these motorized tires would raise the rate for the glider until it reached takeoff speed. However, if you place this on a going runway, the tires would spin on right rate and cancel the motion regarding the treadmill so the airplane would remain motionless and not reach the proper rate for the launch.

okay, making sure that is the response to everybody’s favorite question. But never worry, this answer wont stop the endless discussion—that will go on forever.