Eerie Photos Capture Fear and Paranoia in Washington DC

Something strange is afoot in Washington. Nondescript white vans loiter in peaceful neighborhoods. Office workers hustle bins of papers as a mobile shredder. Burly men with earpieces and no-nonsense demeanors come and get in black SUVs with black windows. Mike Osborne suspects a conspiracy, and he’s determined to make the journey to the base of it.

Osborne uses mundane scenes to produce a plausible realm of conspiracies and malfeasance in their ongoing series White Vans, Black Suburbans. With only some cynicism plus preference for black and white, perhaps the many ordinary of things—a morning paper, a protester keeping a sign, a social gathering seen via a smudged window—become strangely ominous. “You understand how in every cop thriller or spy movie, they’ve this board in which they’ve all of the pictures tacked on with yarn linking them? That’s one of the ways I’m thinking about this project,” Osborne says. “The images are a definite possible dossier. You Place all these things together as well as suggest some larger meaning.”

Maybe not that Osborne purchases into conspiracy theories. But he’s fascinated with those that do. It began a decade ago as he was a grad student within University of Texas. He invested time photographing Alex Jones (yes, that Alex Jones) in Austin. The fascination deepened when Osborne relocated to Washington, DC, in 2012. He lived just obstructs away from politicians like John Kerry and Madeleine Albright and saw even their gardeners suffering a talk to a steel detector. Everything in regards to the town exuded an expression that there is nothing because it seems. And arrived the 2016 election, using its strange claims of a kid sex band and nature cooking therefore a number of other conspiracy theories. “I thought about exactly what would interest me personally if I possessed a conspiratorial mind-set,” he says. “How would I start aesthetically decoding the things I had been seeing on a regular basis?”

He began documenting whatever somebody might deem dubious. A cryptic sign advertising “DoD cyber training.” A hooded figure stealing straight down a sidewalk. An F-16 crash site inside forests of Maryland. He attended political rallies and shot buildings like NSA and FBI headquarters. The images resemble surveillance footage, creating the feeling that you’re taking a look at one thing some one doesn’t wish one to see. You think they’re mundane scenes. But have you been yes? “i believe my interest plays off that dichotomy to be near a locus of power yet not being next to a knowledge of just how energy has been exercised,” he says.

White Vans, Ebony Suburbans feeds off that tension. it is additionally prompt, provided what’s happening in Washington. It’s not only the conspiracy theorists. Everyone’s a little paranoid nowadays.

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Moment’s Snap-on iPhone Lenses Get Their Own Battery Case

Until phones last a week per charge, everyone’s in the market for a battery case. Most of them have a problem: Once you slap a battery pack on your smartphone, there’s no room for fancy lens attachments. Most bulky, pro-minded lens cases don’t have built-in batteries, so you’re stuck with a decision between more juice or more photographic firepower.

Well, you were stuck with that decision, because Moment’s new case pulls double duty. It’s a high-capacity battery case, and it’s built to accept the company’s excellent lens attachments. The thing’s even got a physical shutter button on it—one that uses the Lightning connector, making it much faster than the older Moment case’s Bluetooth button. You also get DSLR-type actions with the button when you take photos within Moment’s app: A half press resets focus and exposure, a full press snaps a photo, and a press-and-hold action fires a burst.

Moment’s Battery Photo Case is roughly the same size as Mophie’s very popular Juice Pack, but it actually outdoes Mophie in terms of capacity. The iPhone 7 version of the case more than doubles the phone’s battery life, thanks to a 2,500mAh cell stuffed inside of it. The iPhone 7 Plus case goes even further, with a 3,500mAh battery to sip from. There’s no physical charge switch on the case as there is on Mophie’s stuff; you choose when you want to recharge via the Moment app.

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This is also Moment’s first case that’s made to work with both lenses on the iPhone 7 Plus, albeit not at the same time. There’s two mounting slots on the case that match up with that phone’s dual-lens setup, so you can use the company’s macro, fisheye, wide-angle, and telephoto lenses with either one.

We usually don’t get down with Kickstarters (they’re unpredictable in terms of quality, and they often don’t even ship), but Moment has a solid track record. The Battery Photo Case will set you back $100 if it reaches its $500,000 goal on Kickstarter. They’ll hit that number number quickly; Moment has a strong following among mobile photography enthusiasts.

Also on offer is a new Photo case—a basic protective case with a mount for Moment lenses—and a redesigned wide-angle lens that works better with the iPhone 7, but also fits Moment mounts for Pixel, Galaxy phones, and older iPhones.

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